Summer Science Camp Empowers New Mexican Young Women

Summer Science Camp Empowers New Mexican Young Women

Two-week program from Los Alamos National Laboratory aims to inspire and increase diversity in STEM fields.

LOS ALAMOS, N.M.,—The third annual Los Alamos National Laboratory Summer Physics Camp for Young Women recently concluded in Pojoaque, giving the 22 students from Northern New Mexico communities a grounding in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines, introducing them to role models, and showcasing the wide range of STEM opportunities available at the Laboratory.

Machine-Learning Competition Boosts Earthquake Prediction Capabilities

Machine-Learning Competition Boosts Earthquake Prediction Capabilities

Competitors’ success predicting quake timing in the online Kaggle competition could help save lives, infrastructure.

LOS ALAMOS, N.M.—Three teams who applied novel machine learning methods to successfully predict the timing of earthquakes from historic seismic data are splitting $50,000 in prize money from an open, online Kaggle competition hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and its partners. 

Los Alamos National Laboratory Brings 24,169 Jobs, $3.1 Billion To New Mexico

Los Alamos National Laboratory Brings 24,169 Jobs, $3.1 Billion To New Mexico 

Independent UNM report analyzes contributions from employment, goods and services, construction, and taxes.

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. — An independent economic impact analysis has found that Los Alamos National Laboratory is responsible for creating 24,169 jobs in New Mexico while contributing $3.1 billion a year—much of it in out-of-state dollars—to the New Mexico economy. 

Researchers Cast Neural Nets To Simulate Molecular Motion

Researchers Cast Neural Nets To Simulate Molecular Motion

Machine learning allows quantum mechanics to be efficiently applied to molecular simulations for drug development, detonation physics and more

LOS ALAMOS, N.M.—New work from Los Alamos National Laboratory, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Florida is showing that artificial neural nets can be trained to encode quantum mechanical laws to describe the motions of molecules, supercharging simulations potentially across a broad range of fields.